Home » Review

The Void – Review

The Void Review

80’s throwbacks are all the rage in indie horror right now. Can this one a’void the pitfalls?

Starring: Aaron Poole, Ellen Wong, Kathleen Munroe, Stephanie Belding
Directors: Jeremy Gillespie, Steven Kostanski

When a cop (Aaron Poole, who looks weirdly like his namesake Aaron Paul) happens upon a blood-soaked figure limping down a deserted stretch of road, he rushes the young man to a nearby hospital staffed by a skeleton crew. Soon hooded cult members have surrounded it, and patients and personnel are transforming into something inhuman. He’ll have to lead the survivors on a hellish voyage into the subterranean depths of the hospital to try and end this nightmare…

The writer-director duo did fx on the likes of Pacific Rim and TV’s Hannibal and turned to Indiegogo to fund The Void’s all-practical creatures. The result is an effectively made Carpenter-inspired Lovecraftian siege horror (think Prince of Darkness meets Fulci), complete with solid performances, unsettling atmospherics and some nice macabre moments (such as the phone call from the morgue).

It almost makes the case for a return to practical monster fx (and does when compared to similarly-budgeted cgi creature features), though the creature designs ought to have shrugged off past influences (The Thing, The Fly, Hellraiser etc) to present something more memorably unique, and they never quite solve the problem of locomotion on the big ones.

The Void Review

GRADE: B

The Void is released in UK cinemas on Friday, and in the US on April 7th.

Also See: 2017 Horror Movies – Guide

Share This Post

From Around The Web

5 Comments »

  • g.d. smith said

    I don’t know if I would call all of them 80s throwbacks. To me neither It Follows or You’re Next were rally like 80s horror. The way they were framed and edited seemed more like Richard Linklater or something. The soundtrack whilst certainly electronic also sound post 90s. This one looks more like an 80s film, but it also looks like an American Horror Story sub plot in some ways.
    What I do like about some recent Horror is they’re letting the plots unfold and characters to take time rather cutting to action or having lots of jump scares.
    I’m not keen on the indie tag, coz actually most horror always was financed and made by independents at anytime after the mid 1950s.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • Sheridan Passell said
      Sheridan Passell

      There’s still plenty of studio horror like the It remake, Alien Covenant, Don’t Breathe, Conjuring 2 etc that have well established studio names behind them. This is a bunch of guys jumping on Indiegogo and saying “let’s make a movie”. It’s a different vibe.

      It feels a lot like Prince of Darkness, heading to Hellraiser, 80s classics. All the obvious influences are from that decade. It Follows feels less like a full-on homage, though it had the Carpenter font, synth and some familiar visuals. Cold in July, The Guest, Purge: Anarchy are just some of the others hoping to recapture the Carpenter atmosphere in some way.

      Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

      • g.d. smith said

        Fair point, I just meant that if you looked at the history of horror a lot of it was made by independents because they were often self financed and released independently. Texas Chainsaw massacre, Night of the Living Dead, Evil Dead, Roger Corman and to an extent even Hammer. I dunno, it’s maybe because I’m a bit put off when indie is used as a generic descriptor. A bit like with music. loads of music is recorded and released independently, but Indie has come to mean something else.
        As for the 80s thing. I just think lots of people grew up watching horror on VHS and a lot of it was made in a way that now seems arty. Longer scenes, cinematic framing and more build. A lot of the modern synth scores are more pumped up and more influenced by dance music rather than prog rock.

        Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

        • Sheridan Passell said
          Sheridan Passell

          You’re right it’s an especially broad descriptor when it comes to horror.

          What do you think 90s-influenced horror (in 10 years) will look like? The 80s were so distinctive, but what was 90s horror? Another slasher cycle? A return to serial killer flicks like Se7en?

          Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

          • g.d. smith said

            It’s hard to say. What I associate with the 90s is high gloss, bright color , pop punk soundtracks and people with model good looks. There’s a confidence about wealth and health to the most fun examples of 90s horror films. They have a sort of soap opera feel. So maybe there is already nostalgia for that bright sheen. I think this what you get from T.V shows like Scream Queens, Slasher, Bates Motel and Scream. You certainly would not have got something like The Blackcoats Daughter in the 1990s.

            Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

Leave A Comment

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.