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Top 25 Best Horror Movies Of 2018

14th – Anna And The Apocalypse
Starring: Ella Hunt, Malcolm Cumming, Marli Siu, Sarah Swire, Christopher Leveaux
Director: John McPhail
Released: November 30, 2018

Horror-Christmas-musical. A sleepy town is threatened by a zombie apocalypse during the Christmas holidays, forcing Anna and her friends to sing and slash their way to safety with a fast-spreading horde in relentless pursuit… This has a team of Scots behind it and is based on the 2010 BAFTA-winning short film ‘Zombie Musical’ co-written by the late Ryan McHenry, creator of viral sensation ‘Ryan Gosling Won’t Eat His Cereal’. Festival critics call it a new holiday classic which balances zombie horror, comedy, Christmas and coming of age with toe-tapping aplomb. Personally I find zombie films, and zombie humour, so tired it needs a significant twist to elevate it. Singing and Christmas probably isn’t enough. Hopefully it’s as good as the underrated musical-horror ‘Stage Fright’ from a few years back.

13th – The House That Jack Built
Starring: Matt Dillon, Bruno Ganz, Uma Thurman, Riley Keough
Director: Lars von Trier
Released: December 28, 2018

The highly intelligent Jack (Dillon) introduces the murders that defined his development as a serial killer over a span of 12 years, postulating each as a work of art. And as the inevitable police intervention is drawing nearer, he is taking greater and greater risks to create the ultimate piece: A collection of all his killings manifested in a House he’s building… Co-starring Uma Thurman as a potential victim and Bruno Ganz from the “Hitler subtitle” memes. Controversial director Lars von Trier (the divisive ‘Dogville’, ‘Nymphomaniac’, etc) last ventured into the horror genre with 2009’s harrowing ‘Antichrist’, but he says this is more brutal. ‘Jack’ caused walkouts at Cannes with its sadism and rule-breaking, although some critics called it just an empty provocation.

12th – Cargo
Starring: Martin Freeman, Anthony Hayes, Caren Pistorius
Directors: Ben Howling, Yolanda Ramke
Released: May 18, 2018

 -Seen It-  After a zombie epidemic spreads over the Australian outback, a recently-bitten father (Freeman, ‘The Hobbit’) searches for someone willing to look after his newborn daughter when he turns… Despite its well-worn “zombie apocalypse” starting point, this is a mature and character-driven story, benefiting from the freshness of its Aboriginal Australian setting, and centered on a great naturalistic performance by Freeman. The opening half hour is sometimes hard to watch as his life with his wife falls apart. Their realistic interactions give events a deep sadness they wouldn’t normally have. The story going forward is, on paper, pretty grim too as his only option is managed decline, wrestling with the right moment to commit suicide, but Freeman manages to inject a humanity and spirit that lifts everything up.

11th – Summer Of 84
Starring: Graham Verchere, Judah Lewis, Caleb Emery, Cory Gruter-Andrew
Directors: RKSS
Released: August 10, 2018

 -Seen It-  After suspecting their cop neighbour is a serial killer, a group of teenage friends spend the summer of ‘84 spying on him and gathering evidence, but as they get closer to discovering the truth, things get dangerous… The creative team from the excellent ‘Turbo Kid’ bring their humour and 80s nostalgia to a much more conventional but still gripping little suspense/horror story. Sitting somewhere between ‘It’, ‘Stranger Things’, ‘Disturbia’ and a dark version of ‘The Hardy Boys’, it’s grounded on a very likeable quartet of teens and a charming atmosphere (multiplied if you were a kid in that era). The mystery of whether the neighbour is guilty or not is well handled, playing with expectations and never letting on until the, extremely tense, finale. But… the film absolutely should have ended there. The post-script sequence goes an unusual, perhaps brave, route but leaves a taste that’s so out of keeping with what went before, it’s hard to see a benefit.

10th – Venom
Starring: Tom Hardy, Riz Ahmed, Michelle Williams
Director: Ruben Fleischer
Released: October 5, 2018

 -Seen It-  A shuttle crashes back to Earth with symbiotes on board – alien life forms that bond to a host to survive. When investigative journalist Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy) asks pressing questions of the space firm’s CEO, Blake (Ahmed, ‘Rogue One’), he finds his career destroyed and his partner (Williams, ‘Blue Valentine’) walks out. 6 months later Brock sneaks into the firm’s lab, where he inadvertently absorbs the symbiote Venom. Now with Venom’s abilities, needs, and voice in his head, the two must co-operate to survive the pursuing security force and Blake’s own transformation into the symbiote Riot… Unfairly maligned by critics, this turns out to be a highly enjoyable creature feature. Together with the upcoming ‘New Mutants’, ‘Venom’ represents an interesting merging of horror and superhero films, as they search for new directions in a crowded marketplace. The most intriguing parts of hero stories are typically the villain’s emergence, and here that’s given maximum breathing room, without constantly cutting back to Spider-Man’s do-gooding. Tom Hardy fully commits. He’s terrific to watch having a meltdown (be it fine dining or a MRI scan), then wrestling with his new duality. The film also sports one of the best hero reveals, a great score, the right quantity of laughs (see Pacino tribute), unique action sequences, and a pretty spectacular ending. Venom’s creature design is wonderfully realised in the most part, leaving the ‘Spider-Man 3’ misfire in the dust. On the downside, Michelle Williams looks out of place, sharing no chemistry with Hardy. FX quality dips sometimes, more often on Riot. There’s some iffy shorthand journalism chat. And when Venom goes full heroic, complete with wide-eyed fear, it’s less effective. There’s no gore, some argue an R-rating was called for, but personally I didn’t miss it. Bring on more Carnage, this doesn’t need Parker just yet.

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14 Comments »

  • gd smith said

    There are some good ones on here.
    I don’t know about the Suspiria remake. On the one hand the teaser trailer is quite good. On the other, it isn’t really a story. So much of it is the visuals and sound, that it seems odd to look at it as any kind narrative fiction. The remake sort of comes across like the Herzog version of Nosferatu. It’s very classy but it simply isn’t Nosferatu, which taken as a story is just Dracula anyway. The actual narrative part of Suspiria is pretty much like any number of kids books where a girl finds out her teachers are witches or maybe the Demon Headmaster or something like that. Some films are just exist in their final form as what they are rather than as stories to be retold.

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    • Sheridan Passell said
      Sheridan Passell

      I wrote this before the teaser trailer was released and was very impressed by the footage, matched my high expectations. Narratively it doesn’t say much but it is only the teaser and horror narratives often just set up a thin premise and then leave the rest to visual mood and suspense (eg Halloween). For me the trailer captures that unsettling dream-like quality of Argento at his best. There’s also something just so creepy about the ’70s aesthetic for horror, starting with the wallpapers.

      Which ones on here are you anticipating the most, or are there any I didn’t include?

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  • gd smith said

    I’ve seen Some of them and liked.
    Looking foreword to Ghost Stories, Heredity, Slice, House that Jack Built, Extremely Wicked and Suspiria, which I think will be good, but it just isn’t Suspiria. The point to me is that you can remake anything, but if you remade say Eraserhead it would not be Eraserhead because it’s not primarily a story in the first place. Suspiria to me is the same kind of thing. It’s too much about authorship and too tied to an aesthetic that only really exists as the 1977 film. From what I gather the director of the new one doesn’t think of it as a remake, but more as separate film with the same title. Really it’s about name recognition being used to green-light an intriguing project. Less interested in things like The Nun.
    Most of them I will watch. I’m a horror nut. The one I’m most doubtful of is Halloween. I love slasher films, but I tend to like the knock-offs more than the sequels. So I’d rather watch a film a bit like Halloween with a masked killer and a different title than another Halloween sequel. But I will absolutely watch the sequels anyway.They’re a bit like nature-run-amok or monster movies, generally, in that respect. Just having a new beast or new killer refreshes the formula.

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    • Sheridan Passell said
      Sheridan Passell

      For me this Halloween is the last hoorah for John Carpenter (it seems he is fairly closely involved), my favourite horror director. It’s just an essential event, one that’s making all the right noises (pre-trailer). Though it will be a major challenge to instill fear again after 40 years of the Myers mask in pop culture.

      Susperia sounds like a genuine passion project from a filmmaker of a superior intellect. If it ends up feeling like its own thing, I’m totally fine with that.

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  • gd smith said

    Having seen the trailer for Halloween, it looks better than I expected.

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    • Sheridan Passell said
      Sheridan Passell

      Seems it’s practically a remake, but it has captured the vibe of the first film very well. Is Myers still scary? Jury’s out on that. Hereditary will almost certainly be the better/more terrifying film, but can’t wait to see it.

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  • putch said

    I watched Suspiria in LA this past weekend and I ABSOLUTELY LOVED IT! It’s top of my list of 2018 horror films (and in all time along with the original). I’m so glad they didn’t copy and paste like Other remakes. This version is definitely more grim and evil. Both are great. Don’t compare. Just love both! You could tell Luca Guadagnino put his heart and soul into this film and it shows. He’s been wanting to make Suspiria since he was a kid. Bravo on a great retelling Luca! Go see it everyone! Don’t believe the bad reviews calling it the next “Mother!”.

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  • 80sLiveThroughMe said

    Summer of 84 is great. It’s funny all these people calling this a Disturbia ripoff when that film was a ripoff of Rear Window. Fright Night? The Burbs? Who cares. I loved every scary creepy minute of it. Total 80s vibe. Absolutely creepy. The quality is great, the story line is interesting. U are connected to all the kids.. The villain is a nightmare. Watch it. Total recommend as best horror movie of 2018.

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  • ancient cat said

    the Ritual i wasnt very encouraged to watch cause of the mixed reviews it received, but in the end its bloody brilliant, the monster that appears is something else.

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  • Manor said

    Mandy – best horror movie of 2018 so far.

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  • MeglaDissapoint said

    I can imagine Jason Statham having a drink with the shark at the end of a day’s filming. Whole thing just piss take of Jaws with no crimson goo.

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  • butchrmeo said

    The 2018 horror movies I would recommend are A Quiet Place & Pyewacket. nothing is as frightning as what you can’t see just sense..

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  • Woodv said

    Annihilation is my 1. An acid trip of a movie. That motherf**king wall in the pool… I’ve never seen body-horror so disturbing yet so beautiful. I felt an insane amount of dread and uneasy

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  • speeddemon said

    some good choices but scariest movies of 2018 are hereditary + veronica watch if you don’t believe me………

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